Moreover, every subject that was of interest to Vronsky, she studied in books and special journals, so that he often went straight to her with questions relating to agriculture or architecture, sometimes even with questions relating to horse-breeding or sport.
He was amazed at her knowledge, her memory, and at first was disposed to doubt it, to ask for confirmation of her facts; and she would find what he asked for in some book, and show it to him.
The building of the hospital, too, interested her.
She did not merely assist, but planned and suggested a great deal herself.
But her chief thought was still of herself--how far she was dear to Vronsky, how far she could make up to him for all he had given up.

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